Zak Irvin ’13 SF

Posted: August 11, 2012 by DeadBefore50 in Basketball, Class of '13
Tags: , , , ,

 

He (Zak Irvin) is long and quick with above average athleticism but truly stands out with his pure scoring ability. His jumpshot is smooth and accurate from anywhere on the court, and when he gets hot there is no stopping him. His handle is quite good for someone his size, and it got better as the season went on – even allowing the 6-foot-6 wing to cameo as a point guard often.

UMHoops.com, August 8th 2012
 
 

Zak Irvin

’13 4-star Zak Irvin


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

CONTENTS

OVERVIEW
STRENGTHS
AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY
PROJECTION
VIDEOS
 
 

RATINGS/RANKINGS


 
 
 

MEASURABLES


 
 
 

OVERVIEW
Zak Irvin’s summer was nothing short of impressive. The ’13 4-star shooting guard played lights out on the AAU circuit and caught the eye of several national scouts. As of August 3rd Irvin’s perimeter-focused play held the #60 spot in ESPNU’s Top 100. The subsequent post-July rankings review dropped August 8th, and Mr. Irvin jumped a cool 39 spots to #21. Previously pigeonholed as little more than an effective outside scorer, Irvin took heed to knocks of his game and made a concerted effort to drive the hoop. By most accounts, Irvin entered the July evaluation period squarely behind fellow University of Michigan commit Derrick Walton’s recruit stock. Four weeks later, and many a scout is reevaluating the play of the 6’6 baller out of Fisher, Indiana’s Hamilton Southeastern High. What remains in question is which version of Zak Irvin hits the court come the start of the ’12-’13 campaign.


 

STRENGTHS
Irvin is a quality scorer and an effective outside shooter. He has earned a rep as a clutch performer and appears comfortable taking the pressure shot. He shot a solid 40% from beyond the arc (’11-’12) despite a late season slump of 3 for 20 (15%). Although he played second-fiddle to senior teammate (now with Michigan State) and 5-star shooting guard Gary Harris, Irvin put up an impressive 18.8 points per game during his junior campaign. As Harris has graduated, Irivn should see increased opportunity to etch his name on the Hamilton Southeastern program. The future Wolverine features a solid pull-up jumper and a quick release from distance. Not an above the rim player, he is a creative finisher and able to score with either hand. An effective rebounder, Irvin averaged 6.2 boards (’11-’12), accounting for 23% of the team total. Made clear by this summer’s performance is Irvin’s ability to create scoring opportunities and effectively drive the hoop. Irvin appears deceptively quick off the dribble. Although not a dazzling ball-handler, his dribble is effective and well-controlled, and he carries enough game to create his own shot. He is a tough on-ball defender and averaged 1.6 steals (’11-’12).

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AREAS OF OPPORTUNITY
Irvin will need to prove his recent (July) performance was more than a well-timed hot streak. Most impressive during the recent AAU run was Irvin’s ability and willingness to attack the rim. This was not the case during the ’11-’12 season. Known almost exclusively as a perimeter player, he did plenty to validate the label. For the season, Irvin attempted 372 (14.8 per game) field goals, and just 80 (3.2 per game) free throws. All told, Irvin’s Free Throw Rate (FTA/FGA) was a surprisingly low .21 (’11-’12). To put that into context, Roschon Prince (led the nation in FTA’s) attempted 392 field goals and 384 free throws last season. That resulted in a stunning Free Throw Rate of .979, or 450% more than that of Irvin. Further exaggerating the free throw issue, once at the line, Irvin made just 69% of his ’11-’12 attempts. Also of interest is the surprisingly low assist total. While attempting 372 field goals, Irvin registered just 53 assists. In short, Irvin attempted 7 shots for every 1 assist he dished out. At 6’6 and just 185lbs, Irvin is slight of build and currently may lack the strength to absorb the physicality of Big Ten play.

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PROJECTION
What to make of Zak Irvin’s July performance? Should the summer AAU run prove little more than a hot streak, he may revert to a “perimeter” approach, mitigating his upside. Although I am confident Irvin can ride a solid jump shot to decent scoring numbers, his overall impact would be fairly one-dimensional. With Gary Harris no longer contributing 25 points a game, Irvin should add to his 18.8 average of ’11-’12 and land in the 20-22 range. The perimeter/more passive Irvin would most likely settle in as a role player for the Michigan Wolverines and provide 10-14 points and 4-5 rebounds per game. His would be a complimentary game and would reliant on teammates serving as the focal point. On the flip side, and as is my opinion, should Irvin’s July run reflect a shift in confidence and evolution of his overall game, Michigan fans and staff should consider themselves lucky to have secured his services early in the process. An aggressive Irvin should see more room to shoot as defenders play off in respect of his dribble drive. There should also arise an increased opportunity to find an open teammate as defenses collapse to slow Irvin’s penetration. More trips into the lane should also produce more trips to the charity stripe and additional scoring opportunity. All told, the 6’6 wing would prove far more impacting and deserving of recent accolades. ’12-’13 projection (Senior season/HS): 23-25 points, 7-8 rebounds, and 4-5 assists, per game. As he transitions to D1 ball, he will need to add 15-20lbs in muscle, and push his free throws above 75%, neither one of which should prove overly challenging. D1 projection: 16-18 points, 5-6 rebounds, and 3-4 assists. As he enters the second half of his D1 career Irvin should develop into a primary scoring option and work himself into All-Conference consideration.

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VIDEO

 

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